Shakespeare's Globe

RSS Rehearsal 2

Ony discusses her work on the text and movement, including the jig and the revelatory mask. Ony also relates a key moment in the play for her character; the set up of Beatrice with Benedick.

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Time: 4 minutes, 33 seconds

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Transcript of Podcast

Hayley Bartley:

Have you done any text work?

Ony Uhaira:

Yes we have. We’ve been working with Giles and he’s really amazing, he’s very useful, very insightful and just he keeps you grounded actually as well and just picks out your own rhythms and your own kind of intonations, so it doesn’t make you feel like the speech is completely alien towards you. And I think the way I approach text if it’s modern or if it’s classical I always try to – it’s going to make sense to me otherwise I know I’m not good doing a good job.

HB:

Were there any parts that you didn’t quite get or thought you got but then he corrected you?

OU:

Yeah, definitely. There were some I’d say like a couple and I know it’s not coming out because I know I don’t understand the imagery of the words fully, so I’d go “Giles, this bit here, does it mean this that and this that and this that? Or does it mean...” you know. And then he’ll go “Oh, it’s the first one that you said. Oh no it’s the second option.” And I’m okay.

HB:

It’s kind of more in depth and now it’s this that you can do, that you maybe don’t have the chance to do in proper rehearsals.

OU:

Yeah, or some when you’re by yourself and you’re trying to, you know, you’re putting it into your own context and your own phrasing. Yeah, he’s very helpful in that way.

HB:

Yeah, he sounds it. And you spoke a little bit about movement, but have you done many sessions on movement and the jig perhaps?

OU:

Yeah, we’ve been dancing a lot. I think we, as a company, we start getting really giddy when we have with our dance sessions because they’re just so much fun and it’s so satisfying getting twirled around and stuff. We are looking forward to that. I think we might have one later on today.

HB:

I imagine it really lifts the energy, something very different rather than going through the play can get quite monotonous.

OU:

And even like - because you said someone once wrote to watch All’s Well just for their press last night. They have of the last scene just snow balls and it’s building up and then it’s just so satisfying and it just really elevates you to have that, to finish off a play with a dance. It’s just quite special, it gets the crowd all “ahh”.

HB:

It’s kind of the battle of the jigs because they’ve got a good jig so I’m looking forward to seeing Much Ado’s.

OU:

Yeah, we’ve got a few I think. Yeah, we’ve got a few.

HB:

Because you have the mask.

OU:

The mask, yeah. I think that’s quite funny.

HB:

I love masks in early modern drama. I think they’re great and they’re such a good way of – it’s all about revelation.

OU:

Disguise, and you feel kind of like you’ve got free reign and I think it’s so funny that all the men are like “Oh yeah, the ladies don’t know who I am like this”. But they just got them straight away, it’s funny, it’s going to be great.

HB:

Can I ask, is there any particular scene or moment in the play that you think is significant to the interpretation of your character?

OU:

I’m a bit of a slow burn, a slow burner I think of an actress, and so you know I kind of never allow myself to have the time to find out how I’m interacting with other people and to discover how I’m feeling in the scene. And I think as we’ve been moving on and then just having more confidence and allowing myself to breathe in the thoughts of the language. And when Hero is kind of getting her girls ready in preparation to set Beatrice up and then she just gets swept away on this metaphor. Kind of rooted itself in me yesterday properly when my lungs just kind of went “ohh there it is!” So I think that kind of section I’m enjoying the language and allowing the language to overtake me and fill me.

HB:

Like you said, with the women she is more open say that’s the time when you will get to know her maybe. And do you think, I remember in the first interview you were just very much – it was all very new, and it was like “she doesn’t speak much” but do you think your initial impressions have changed or maybe been confirmed?

OU:

I’m still, I suppose we are putting together the acts now. I’m still not trying to rush ahead and impose anything new on her. Once we kind of go through the play maybe for the first time or at least three acts, to actually feel the journey rather than separated in the way we’re working now, maybe then I’ll have more of an idea of who she is. But more and more it’s part of this whole story that goes on all these twists and turns.

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