Shakespeare's Globe

RSS Pre-Rehearsal

“I'm realising that she’s not just wild and angry, there’s a lot more to her and there are reasons why she acts the way she does.”
In her first interview Kate discusses her thoughts about Katherina, and how those changed since she first read the play as a child.

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Time: 4 minutes 40 seconds

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Transcript of Podcast

Phil Brooks:

Hello and welcome to the 2013 Adopt an Actor podcast series. My name is Phil Brooks and I’m here talking with Kate Lamb who is playing Kate in the Globe touring production of The Taming of the Shrew.

So how familiar were you with the play?

Kate Lamb:

It was actually the first play I ever read. So quite familiar really. My name is Kate and her name is Kate and the name Kate is said quite a lot. So as a young girl, I found it very exciting to have a Shakespeare play that I thought was written about me. 

PB:

So you had read it before you started your role obviously?

KL:

I did yes, it is a play that I’m quite familiar with and have quite a complicated relationship with, just for the obvious reasons of its delicate subject matter.  

PB:

What were your initial impressions of the play?

KL:

Well when I was 6 or whatever, I thought ‘wow this Kate, she’s so strong and wild and free’, and I was a real tomboy and she just seemed so on her own and independent, and I always thought that was really great and I admired her spirit and I loved that. I think as I’ve grown older I’ve realised all of the reasons that she’s actually quite a sad character in many ways, lonely, for all of that independence. So I think she’s just grown in complexity as I’ve come to know the play more.

PB:

So your initial impressions of your character, how do you think those have changed since you saw her as a child?

KL:

Yeah or even over the last week and a half really, things have changed dramatically. There’s been some great initial movement work in the room and just inhabiting what I feel to be her – the way she breathes, the way she lives, what her focuses are. And I’m realising that she’s not just wild and angry, that there’s a lot more to her and there are reasons as to why she acts the way she does. So yes my impressions have changed. She isn’t this ball of wild, carefree energy…

PB:

Finding the meaning of why she’s doing these things…

KL:

Exactly and I think that’s becoming clearer to me now than its ever been. Obviously I’m getting the time and the reason to really properly get inside her, so yes it’s quite enlightening.

PB:

Have you performed Shakespeare before?

KL:

Never professionally no. This is sort of a dream come true to be doing it on the Globe stage and to take it all around the world as well. But no I’ve never done it professionally. I dabbled in some stuff at uni. Shakespeare has always been a big part of my life, I watched cartoon versions when I was really little, and I read them very young and it’s sort of the reason I become an actor, yeah.

PB:

And so you haven’t performed at the Globe before, have you gone out onto the stage and had a look yet?

KL:

We have gone out once and I was lucky enough to do a few lines whilst there were some tours going on as everything is always happening at the Globe, it’s fantastic it’s always buzzing. And we’re working with the fantastic Martin who does voice with us, and he just told us a few magic tricks and then suddenly I made three different tours stop talking and listen to the few words, and I couldn’t remember any of the rest of the lines as I’m not off book yet and suddenly felt terribly guilty that they were listening to something that I hadn’t prepared properly. 

PB:

Suddenly expecting a show to begin…

KL:

Yes! I think it’s a magical space and I can’t explain why at the moment but just that little taste has made me so much more excited.

PB:

What preparation have you done for your role before the rehearsals started?

KL:

I don’t like to second guess too much, and as I was already quite familiar with the play I don’t want to have too many preconceived ideas coming in to the room. Because I think the director’s vision and how you play with the other actors on stage are really what – for me- what makes a character and makes the play. So just knowing that I knew the process of events and the story that needed to  be told, that was as much as I wanted to do before I came into the room to be perfectly honest. 

PB:

I guess it’s that leaving the group discussion and thoughts about it to develop there rather than coming in with- 

KL:

Absolutely. It’s no use coming in saying this is how I want to do it, and this is the only way, because so many other people in the room have got brilliant brains, and we’ve got all the people that have come from the Globe as well who are sitting in. We’ve got Giles from text and everybody. Theres no point ignoring all of that or coming with your own ideas as there never gonna be- one person sitting on their own is never gonna come up with things that a whole group of people talking will.

PB:

Great thank you very much!

KL:

Thank you!

 

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