Shakespeare's Globe

RSS Rehearsal 2

“She’s not as fiery or as strong as she makes out or thinks she is. And that a lot of it is born of insecurity and fear.”
Rehearsals continue and Kate talks about Katherina’s relationship with her father, the importance of music, and the satisfaction of sugar glass.

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Time: 6 minutes 28 seconds

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Transcript of Podcast

Phil Brooks:

So what have you been doing in rehearsals since we last spoke?

Kate Lamb:

We’ve been running the last few days, which is great. So we’ve been working through the scenes, through the different acts in detail since we got a broad structure of the blocking last week. Now we’re sort of going over things in detail, now in the afternoon over the last few days we’ve been doing a run through to kind of put it all together and if it makes sense and if it is a play, which it is. So that’s really good! So that’s basically what we’ve been doing. And then still been doing music calls and learning all the songs, working out how they transition into each act, and what job those bits of music do. Whether it’s a song or a bit of music or some instruments. And  I’ve seen Glynn [MacDonald, Globe Associate, Movement] the wonderful Alexander, who gave me some really interesting insights and tips about Katherina’s movement, and just Alexandered me; for those of you who don’t know is a fantastic way of lengthening and opening the body- it’s a bit like magic but it’s wonderful and makes you feel like you’re made of cloud afterwards.

PB:

How is seeing the play a whole?

KL:

I can’t see it as a whole, it’s really annoying! I mean luckily I do have quite a few scenes where I can sit out whereas other people who are doubling up are in a lot of scenes, so they are having to rush around from different storyline to different storyline. Whereas I can sit and watch the subplot and then just be in my lot, so I get to see that, and that’s fantastic and it’s really coming together and it’s really funny. It’s amazing, there’s so much talent in the room, you’re seeing some fantastic comedic talent and beautiful singing. It’s really exciting actually, and having the play, reaching the play’s finale which is quite important, and they way that we are doing it is quite important. And its suddenly become very empowering for us as eight women. So that’s really exciting.

PB:

How important is music to your production?

KL:

So important! We’ve discovered so important. I mean it’s great to be in control of that kind of element as actors, it’s really cool. Sometimes it’s a hindrance ‘cause you know ‘Oh where’s my Saxophone? How do I pick it up, how do I get to it? Will it fit on my costume?’ You know, it’s an extra thing to think about which is annoying but at the end of the day, it brings us all together in a really exciting way, because we have to be in tune, we have to be listening to each other in more ways than one. And, the music actually, we’ve ended up- Josh the assistant director realised that actually we’d incidentally placed musical interludes at the end of each act within the structure of the play, within the five acts rather than a half and a half. And we sort of worked out what they were transitioning us from one thing to another and from the next issue, what this act deals with and what that act dealt with. Or whether it’s finishing or whether it’s starting and actually the music really helps to digest what’s gone before and prepare you for what’s coming. So we’re just having these little bits dropped in here and there but it’s great. We’ve created a couple of bands amongst ourselves – the ‘Travelling Shrews’, ‘Shrew times two’ or something, I can’t remember! We’ve got a couple of little band names going.

PB:

How are the jig rehearsals going?

KL:

I’m having to dance and play, but I don’t have to dance and play and sing which is what Remy has to do, she’s playing the guitar. So it’s just like patting your head and rubbing your stomach a little bit, you’re just having to concentrate on so many different things and quite sure you’re not. But it’s going to be really necessary to lift us out of that finale. So they’re going fine, there’s still some work to do but it will be great.

PB:

Is this your first jig you’ve ever done or have you done similar things?

KL:

Yes…I’ve done musicals so there’s that sort of element to it. But this is definitely the first time I’ve done a jig and it’s something that really stands alone with the Globe theatre. I remember that’s always been the moment as an audience member that I’ve remembered. I remembered watching that play as I remembered the jig at the end. There’s something about it, and I don’t know what it is- it doesn’t matter what play it follows but there’s something very special I think. I’m very excited to be doing it.

PB:

How have your initial impressions of your character changed or have they been confirmed since the start of the rehearsals?

 

KL:

Well I sort of…at the start of rehearsals I was beginning to realise that Katherina is not as – she’s not as fiery or as strong as she makes out or thinks she is. And that a lot of it is born of insecurity and fear. And I think actually really really wanting to be accepted by her father- wanting her father’s approval, that’s become a very important relationship for me, for my development of the character. And Kat’s [Kathryn Hunt, Baptista Minola & Grumio] given me some fantastic things to work with and we’ve really built that. So yeah I think what I’ve discovered is her history before the play, which I hadn’t had cause to pry into I suppose. And that’s really informed who she is. And I think she’s a gentler person than people consider her to be.

PB:

Is there anything you have particularly enjoyed in rehearsals so far?

KL:

I’ve enjoyed everything, I just love coming into work. I was just thinking that this morning, walking my dog and thinking you know I’ve kind of got the best job in the world. Actually the best thing, the most exciting thing I did the other day was I – I won’t give too much away but I get to bottle someone. And sugar glass is the most satisfying thing in the world! It just shatters, and I get to smack somebody over the head with it, so as I said very gentle character! But no it comes from a different part. But yeah that’s really fun. And the fight calls are exciting, and I’ve had a lot of fun with that.  

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