Shakespeare's Globe

RSS Rehearsal 2

"She doesn't speak a lot!" As rehearsals draw to a close, Sam reflects on Kate's use of language and what she has found out about the character through the rehearsal process.

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Time: 3 minutes 9 seconds

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Transcript of Podcast

Hayley Bartley:

Have you done any text work throughout rehearsals so far?

Sam Spiro:

Yes, I’ve had a very good session with Giles [Block, text associate], who’s incredibly positive and incredibly helpful. He doesn’t want to sort of fix anything that’s not broken, if you know what I mean, but he just gives you little teasers and just little hints of things that he feels, rhythmically, might give another option. And then, if we discuss it and we feel that we want to go with that, then we can but obviously it’s an open discussion. But it’s really, really, great. He’s just-after our first run in the rehearsal room… first and last run in the rehearsal room- he then provided us with a booklet of just our lines and he took notes from that run and it was really, really helpful. Yeah, it was great.

Hayley:

Have you noticed anything about Kate’s language, then?

Sam:

The thing that we noticed fairly early on is that she doesn’t speak for a lot and she’s certainly not somebody who doesn’t want to air her opinions. So, it’s making choices of why she goes so silent.  So, that’s been a very interesting bit of the journey.

Hayley:

Whenever you think of Kate, it’s like: feisty, talks so much and all this.

Sam:

That’s right. She’s screaming her head off. So, she chooses to be silent at certain points. And, then there are, of course, times where we’ve decided that Petruchio is keeping her quiet, you know, and there’s lots of comic value in that as well.

Hayley:

What about any voice sessions?

Sam:

No. I haven’t done anything on the stage yet, but I’m looking forward to doing that this week, but it’s very interesting sitting and listening to other people; just how brilliant the acoustics are, actually. It’s more about direction, I think, and articulation and thought-energy right through to the end of the line, rather than shouting. I mean, it’s pretty obvious stuff to say, but it really does make a difference, just that energy of thought.

Hayley:

So, have you had any sessions on movement, then?

Sam:

Obviously, there’s so much that’s incredibly physical in the show, so we’ve been working a lot with Malcolm, the fight director, and I’m very conscious of warming my body up every morning because it is quite demanding.

Hayley:

Is your relationship with Petruchio quite a physical one?

Sam:

Right from the beginning it’s incredibly physical, yes, which is something that, in the first rehearsal when we hit their first wooing scene, Simon and I both felt very, very strongly that it should be physical and as soon as we started to physicalize it, the language really came to life and you feel as though that must be the right way to go with it.

Hayley:

So have your initial impressions of Kate changed since the beginning of the process?

Sam:

There haven’t been any dramatic changes of thought. It’s been more sort of by osmosis that things become more detailed and you start to understand the journey of that person, because I think, at first, I found it hard to see this desperately unhappy woman, at the beginning, who’s angry with the world, to somebody that is able to find this love, and is able to give this love. To sort of join those two people up and make it into one person is now starting to make much more sense to me.

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