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Two Noble Kinsmen (2000)

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Playwright: William Shakespeare and John Fletcher
Directed by: Tim Carroll

When the King of Athens, Theseus, conquers the city of Thebes, he is struck by the great skill in battle of the ‘Two Noble Kinsmen.’

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Hamlet (2000)

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Playwright: William Shakespeare
Directed by: Giles Block

No play tells us more about Shakespeare's views on acting and the role of theatre in society as a way of mirroring the truth.

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The Tempest (2000)

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Playwright: William Shakespeare
Directed by: Lenka Udovicki

No play tells us more about Shakespeare's views on the cathartic role of theatre in society, and on theatre as a healer of wrongs in this story of exile, revenge and eventual forgiveness.

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Augustine's Oak (1999)

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Playwright: Peter Oswald
Directed by: Tim Carroll

Augustine’s Oak is based on the account of St. Augustine’s conversion of the pagan Anglo-Saxons in 597 AD and his attempt to bring the Welsh believers under the sway of the Roman Church.

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Antony & Cleopatra (1999)

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Playwright: William Shakespeare
Directed by: Giles Block

In the power struggle following Julius Caesar's death, Antony, becomes the irrational betrayer of his Roman honour, deserting his wife and making war on Octavius Caesar.

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The Comedy Of Errors (1999)

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Playwright: William Shakespeare
Directed by: Kathryn Hunter

When a stranger searching for his lost family and servants is sentenced to death, the goddess fortune plays her part, reuniting the scattered family and restoring the battered self.

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Julius Caesar (1999)

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Playwright: William Shakespeare
Directed by: Mark Rylance

Ambition, honour, prophecy and civic responsibility versus personal loyalty are all themes in this great tragedy.

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A Mad World, My Masters (1998)

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Playwright: Thomas Middleton
Directed by: Sue Lefton

Middleton's satire of London is first and foremost a deeply moral play. All societies are in a state of transition but the one this play depicts obviously one where the status quo has been shaken.

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