Backstage Cast interviews Backstage Cast interviews

‘ Scholars have been asking such questions for decades. Although we may never have definitive answers, research at London’s Globe Theatre is providing important new approaches and insights.’

Matthew Reisz, Times Higher Education

Shakespeare's Globe

DateS:

Thursday 7 May
Thursday 4 June
Thursday 2 July
Thursday 6 August

TIME:

6.00pm - 8.30pm

VENUE:

Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, Shakespeare's Globe

TICKETS:

£12 (£7 FoSG/Student)

BOOKING:

Telephone:
+44 (0)20 7401 9919 

Online: 
Ticket Office

In Person:
Monday - Saturday
10am - 6pm

Sunday
10am - 5pm

Shakespeare's Globe,
21 New Globe Walk,
Bankside,
London SE1 9DT

 

Please note, late comers may not be admitted.

  • Education/ResearchInAction2

Research In Action

Share the process of discovery as actors and practitioners explore performance in our indoor Jacobean theatre.

Our Research in Action workshops give you the chance to be part of our exploration into the indoor theatres of seventeenth-century London. The workshops mix theatre practice and scholarship in an engaging investigation of the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse’s theatrical capacities.

Using extracts from well-known and less-familiar plays, Globe actors and leading academics will test the dramatic and technical potential of our indoor space. Expect discoveries – and expect to be asked for your feedback!

                      

Book Online

 

Performing gender on the indoor stage

Thursday 7 May

Scenes directed by Philip Bird. Co-ordinated by Dr Will Tosh.

Professional women actors didn’t appear on the English stage until the Restoration. In Shakespeare’s theatre, female roles were taken by boys or young men.

In recent years many productions have experimented with all-male or all-female casts. But plays have rarely been staged under the conventions familiar to Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

In this candle-lit workshop, we turn the clock back. We’ll present scenes from The Duchess of Malfi, The White Devil and ’Tis Pity She’s a Whore, each performed in two ways. Firstly as early modern Londoners would have seen them, with a talented boy player (from the Globe Young Company), and then with an adult woman actor.

We’ll be asking for your thoughts and observations. What differences do you detect in the two stagings? How does your perception of and response to gender differ when the scene is performed by a teenage boy, and then by a young woman? Does candle light assist the illusion? What is the impact of period costume and cosmetics? 

 


Thursday 4 June

Details to follow.


Thursday 2 July

Details to follow.


Thursday 6 August

Details to follow.

 

JOIN THE CONVERSATION 

Tell us what you think about Research In Action. Tweet us your thoughts to @The_Globe and include the hashtag #SWPResearch. Or add your comments on our Facebook page.

Research In Action